How coronavirus is impacting public transport

A SEPTA train
File

SEPTA, PATCO and NJ Transit are already preparing for how coronavirus (COVID-19) will impact riders in the near future.

All transportation giants are taking preventive steps by upping their cleaning efforts, keeping an eye on updates and sharing tips.

“SEPTA’s open for business,” Jim Fox, SEPTA’s assistant general manager for system safety said during a press conference, according to Inquirer.com.

Fox added, “It is safe to continue to take our service, and we will continue to run our regular service as we see how this thing evolves.”

According to WHYY.org, SEPTA will have crew using disinfectants to sanitize high contact surfaces in stations such as the kiosks and turnstiles. They will be sanitized at least three times a day.

It was reported that every two weeks, the vehicles will go through a more intense, detailed cleaning.

The additional cleaning will not impact service. It was also reported that there had not been a dip in ridership since the threat of the COVID-19.

Although all areas of Philly will be taken care of, high-trafficked spots will be a focus for the city. Stations such as 15th Street, City Hall, 69th Street stations and Frankford Transportation Center will be a focus.

SEPTA will also be sharing common-sense tips online and at stations.

When it comes to PATCO, they are also enhancing the daily cleaning and sanitizing of highly-touched services to be safe.

It was reported they have stocked up on supplies to prepare for the virus.

“The health and safety of our employees and customers is our highest priority,” PATCO spokesperson Mike Williams said in a statement to WHYY.org.

It was reported that they are also providing common-sense tips to riders and Delaware River Port Authority shared an informational video with passengers last week.

NJ Transit has announced its plans to combat COVID-19 as well.

Inquirer.com reports that NJ Transit is disinfecting vehicles every 24 hours and enhancing cleaning contact surfaces. Some of the surfaces include handrails, vending machines, door handles and more.

Spokesperson Kate Thompson told Inquirer.com, “The cleaning agents used in this effort are deemed effective for these purposes and contain anti-viral components such as bleach/water mixes and other disinfectant sprays.”

As of Sunday afternoon, Pennsylvania has six cases of the COVID-19, but all are located outside of Philadelphia county.

Inquirer.com reports that four cases are in Montgomery County. They also reported that that among those who tested positive are an adult man in Worcester and an adult woman in Lower Gwynedd.

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