The PMA entices art lovers with new works, from golf balls to nudes

“Frauenbildnis (Portrait of a Woman)” by Gustav Klimt is at the PMA.

The female figure
Works by Viennese painter Gustav Klimt, known best for his gilded gold piece “The Kiss,” and by his protege Egon Schiele were also recently unveiled at the museum. Both artists made a splash in the early 1900s with their sensual paintings of the female figure.

Klimt and Schiele were part of an innovative group of architects, designers and painters “who loosely gathered under the rubric Secessionists,” says curator Joseph Richel.

“Two large and critical paintings by each of these haunting figures will be on view at the museum: a portrait of a beautiful young woman painted some five years after her suicide by Klimt who himself died before completing it,” Richel says, “and a powerfully erotic telling of an ancient Greek myth by the 19-year-old Schiele in homage to his master, Klimt.”

Tee up
The Philadelphia Museum of Art is catering to your dad with “The Art of Golf,” an exhibit centered around “The Golfers,” an 4 x 7 foot painting created in 1847 by Scottish artist Charles Lees.

The painting depicts a game played at St. Andrews, one of the oldest golf courses in the world, and each painted spectator watching the action is a known 19th-century golfer or golf expert.

Also on display is a “feathery ball” that golfers used back in the day.

The exhibit coincides with the U.S. Open Championship, which will bring Tiger Woods and other famous — though less infamous — golfers to the Merion Golf Club in Ardmore this summer.

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